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Computer Vision Syndrome



Computer Vision Syndrome, also referred to as Digital Eye Strain, describes a group of eye and vision-related problems that result from prolonged computer, tablet, e-reader and cell phone use. Many individuals experience eye discomfort and vision problems when viewing digital screens for extended periods. The level of discomfort appears to increase with the amount of digital screen use.Computer vision syndrome (CVS) is a temporary condition resulting from focusing the eyes on a computer display for protracted, uninterrupted periods of time. Some symptoms of CVS include headaches, blurred vision, and neck pain, redness in the eyes, fatigue, eye strain, dry eyes, irritated eyes, double vision, vertigo / dizziness, polyopia, and difficult refocusing the eyes. These symptoms can be further aggravated by improper lighting conditions (i.e. glare or bright overhead lighting) or air moving past the eyes (e.g. overhead vents, direct air from a fan).

Nowadays, Computer and Smart mobile phone become a part of our life, for some it’s not a part of life it becomes major in their life. Computer eye strain is a common problem that everyone experiences. We strain our eyes using the computer, reading, watching TV and doing other demanding visual tasks. After a long day of staring at a computer at work, many people relax by staring at a different computer at home. Between spreadsheets and Facebook, our eyes are seeing more pixels than ever before. Staring at a computer monitor for hours on end has become a part of the modern workday and inevitably, all of that staring can put a real strain on our eyes. With so many of us using computers at work, computer eye strain has become a major job-related complaint. Studies show that eye strain and other bother some visual symptoms occur in 50 to 90 percent of computer workers. The name for eye problems caused by computer use is computer vision syndrome (CVS). CVS is not one specific eye problem.

Instead, the term encompasses a whole range of eyestrain and pain experienced by computer users. In addition, working adults aren't the only ones vulnerable to computer vision syndrome. Kids who stare at portable video games or who use computers throughout the day at school also can experience eye problems related to computer use, especially if the lighting and computer position are less than ideal.


According to the US National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, computer vision syndrome affects some 90% of the people who spend three hours or more a day at a computer.

Process by which computer screen beam affect vision

 

Computer vision syndrome is similar to other repetitive stress injuries at work like carpal tunnel syndrome. It occurs when you’re carrying out the same motion over and over again. Just like those other repetitive stress injuries, computer vision syndrome can get worse the longer you continue the activity. Working at a computer requires that the eyes continuously focus, move back and forth, and align with what you are seeing. You may have to look down at papers and then back up to type, and the eyes have to accommodate to changing images on the screen in order to create a clear picture for the brain to interpret.

Viewing a computer screen often makes the eyes work harder. As a result, the unique characteristics and high visual demands of computer viewing make many individuals susceptible to the development of vision-related symptoms.

Uncorrected vision problems can increase the severity of Computer Vision Syndrome symptoms Viewing a computer screen is different than reading a printed page. Often the letters on the computer screen are not as precise or sharply defined; the level of contrast of the letters to the background is reduced, and the presence of glare and reflections on the screen may make viewing difficult. Viewing distances and angles used for computer work are also often different from those commonly used for other reading or writing tasks. As a result, the eye focusing and eye movement requirements for computer viewing can place additional demands on the visual system. In addition, the presence of even minor vision problems can often significantly affect comfort and performance at a computer. Uncorrected or under corrected vision problems can be major contributing factors to computer related eyestrain. Even people who have an eyeglass or contact lens prescription may find it’s not suitable for the specific viewing distances of their computer screen. Some people tilt their heads at odd angles because their glasses aren’t designed for looking at a computer. Or they bend toward the screen in order to see it clearly. Their postures can result in muscle spasms or pain in the neck, shoulder or back. In most cases, symptoms of CVS occur because the visual demands of the task exceed the visual abilities of the individual to comfortably perform them. At greatest risk for developing CVS are those persons who spend two or more continuous hours at a computer every day

Causes of CVS

Uncorrected vision problems can increase the severity of Computer Vision Syndrome or Digital Eye Strain symptoms.

Viewing a computer or digital screen is different than reading a printed page. Often the letters on the computer or handheld device are not as precise or sharply defined, the level of contrast of the letters to the background is reduced, and the presence of glare and reflections on the screen may make viewing difficult.

Viewing distances and angles used for this type of work are also often different from those commonly used for other reading or writing tasks. As a result, the eye focusing and eye movement requirements for digital screen viewing can place additional demands on the visual system.

In addition, the presence of even minor vision problems can often significantly affect comfort and performance at a computer or while using other digital screen devices. Uncorrected or under corrected vision problems can be major contributing factors to computer-related eyestrain.

Even people who have an eyeglass or contact lens prescription may find it's not suitable for the specific viewing distances of their computer screen. Some people tilt their heads at odd angles because their glasses aren't designed for looking at a computer. Or they bend toward the screen in order to see it clearly. Their postures can result in muscle spasms or pain in the neck, shoulder or back.

In most cases, symptoms of CVS or Digital Eye Strain occur because the visual demands of the task exceed the visual abilities of the individual to comfortably perform them. At greatest risk for developing CVS or Digital Eye Strain are those persons who spend two or more continuous hours at a computer or using a digital screen device every day.

Symptoms of CVS

  • Eyestrain
  • Headaches
  • Blurred vision Difficulty in changing focus between far and near
  • Dryness of eyes
  • Irritated eyes
  • Tired eyes
  • Redness
  • Contact lens discomfort

Neck, shoulder and backache can also be related to the way we use our eyes at the computer.

Computer Vision Syndrome or Digital Eye Strain diagnosed



Computer Vision Syndrome, or Digital Eye Strain, can be diagnosed through a comprehensive eye examination. Testing, with special emphasis on visual requirements at the computer or digital device working distance, may include:

  • Patient history to determine any symptoms the patient is experiencing and the presence of any general health problems, medications taken, or environmental factors that may be contributing to the symptoms related to computer use.
  • Visual acuity measurements to assess the extent to which vision may be affected.
  • refraction to determine the appropriate lens power needed to compensate for any refractive errors (nearsightedness, farsightedness or astigmatism).
  • Testing how the eyes focus, move and work together. In order to obtain a clear, single image of what is being viewed, the eyes must effectively change focus, move and work in unison. This testing will look for problems that keep your eyes from focusing effectively or make it difficult to use both eyes together.

This testing may be done without the use of eye drops to determine how the eyes respond under normal seeing conditions. In some cases, such as when some of the eyes' focusing power may be hidden, eye drops may be used. They temporarily keep the eyes from changing focus while testing is done.

Using the information obtained from these tests, along with results of other tests, your optometrist can determine if you have Computer Vision Syndrome or Digital Eye Strain and advise you on treatment options.

Self Care Measure:

Here are some easy steps you can take to reduce your risk of computer eye strain and other common symptoms of computer vision syndrome (CVS):

Get a comprehensive eye exam - Having a routine comprehensive eye exam is the most important thing you can do to prevent or treat computer vision problems. According to the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), computer users should have an eye exam before they start working on a computer and once a year thereafter.

Use proper lighting - Eye strain often is caused by excessively bright light either from outdoor sunlight coming in through a window or from harsh interior lighting. When you use a computer, your ambient lighting should be about half as bright as that typically found in most offices. Eliminate exterior light by closing drapes, shades or blinds. Reduce interior lighting by using fewer light bulbs or fluorescent tubes, or use lower intensity bulbs and tubes. If possible, position your computer monitor or screen so windows are to the side, instead of in front or behind it.

Minimize glare - Glare on walls and finished surfaces, as well as reflections on your computer screen also can cause computer eye strain. Consider installing an anti-glare screen on your monitor and, if possible, paint bright white walls a darker colour with a matte finish. Again, cover the windows. When outside light cannot be reduced, consider using a computer hood.

If you wear glasses, purchase lenses with anti-reflective (AR) coating. AR coating reduces glare by minimizing the amount of light reflecting off the front and back surfaces of your eyeglass lenses.

Upgrade your display - If you have not already done so, replace your old tube-style monitor (called a cathode ray tube or CRT) with a flat-panel liquid crystal display (LCD), like those on laptop computers. LCD/LED screens are easier on the eyes and usually have an anti-reflective surface. Old fashioned CRT screens can cause a noticeable “flicker” of images, which is a major cause of computer eye strain. Even if this flicker is imperceptible, it still can contribute to eye strain and fatigue during computer work.

Adjust your computer display settings - Adjusting the display settings of your computer can help reduce eye strain and fatigue. Generally, these adjustments are beneficial:

Brightness - Adjust the brightness of the display so it’s approximately the same as the brightness of your surrounding workstation. As a test, look at the white background of this Web page. If it looks like a light source, it’s too bright. If it seems dull and grey, it may be too dark.

Text size and contrast - Adjust the text size and contrast for comfort, especially when reading or composing long documents. Usually, black print on a white background is the best combination for comfort.

Colour Temperature - This is a technical term used to describe the spectrum of visible light emitted by a colour display. Blue light is short-wavelength visible light that is associated with more eye strain than longer wavelength hues, such as orange and red. Reducing the colour temperature of your display lowers the amount of blue light emitted by a colour display for better long-term viewing comfort.

Silicone hydrogel contact lenses were associated with more comfort than regular soft lenses among computer users.

Blink more often - Blinking is very important when working at a computer; blinking moistens your eyes to prevent dryness and irritation. When working at a computer, people blink less frequently — about one-third as often as they normally do— and many blinks performed during computer work are only partial lid closures, according to studies. To reduce your risk of dry eyes during computer use, try this exercise: Every 20 minutes, blink 10 times by closing your eyes as if falling asleep (very slowly). This will help rewet your eyes.

Exercise your eyes - Another cause of computer eye strain is focusing fatigue. To reduce your risk of tiring your eyes by constantly focusing on your screen, look away from your computer at least every 20 minutes and gaze at a distant object (at least 20 feet away) for at least 20 seconds. Some eye doctors call this the “20-20-20 rule.” Looking far away relaxes the focusing muscle inside the eye to reduce fatigue.

Another exercise is to look far away at an object for 10-15 seconds, then gaze at something up close for 10-15 seconds. Then look back at the distant object. Do this 10 times.

Take frequent breaks - To reduce your risk for computer vision syndrome and neck, back and shoulder pain, take frequent breaks during your computer work day. Many workers take only two 15-minute breaks from their computer throughout their work day. According to a recent NIOSH study, discomfort and eye strain were significantly reduced when computer workers took four additional five-minute “minibreaks” throughout their work day. And these supplementary breaks did not reduce the workers’ productivity. Data entry speed was significantly faster as a result of the extra breaks, so work output was maintained even though the workers had 20 extra minutes of break time each day. During your computer breaks, stand up, move about and stretch your arms, legs, back, neck and shoulders to reduce tension and muscle fatigue.

Consider computer eyewear – For the greatest comfort at your computer, you might benefit from having your eye care professional modify your eyeglasses prescription to create customized computer glasses This is especially true if you normally wear contact lenses, which may become dry and uncomfortable during sustained computer work. Computer glasses also are a good choice if you wear bifocals or progressive lenses, because these lenses generally are not optimal for the distance to your computer screen.

Body positioning for computer use.

Some important factors in preventing or reducing the symptoms of CVS have to do with the computer and how it is used. This includes lighting conditions, chair comfort, location of reference materials, position of the monitor, and the use of rest breaks.

  • Location of computer screen - Most people find it more comfortable to view a computer when the eyes are looking downward. Optimally, the computer screen should be 15 to 20 degrees below eye level (about 4 or 5 inches) as measured from the center of the screen and 20 to 28 inches from the eyes.
  • Reference materials - These materials should be located above the keyboard and below the monitor. If this is not possible, a document holder can be used beside the monitor. The goal is to position the documents so you do not need to move your head to look from the document to the screen.
  • Lighting - Position the computer screen to avoid glare, particularly from overhead lighting or windows. Use blinds or drapes on windows and replace the light bulbs in desk lamps with bulbs of lower wattage.
  • Anti-glare screens - If there is no way to minimize glare from light sources, consider using a screen glare filter. These filters decrease the amount of light reflected from the screen.
  • Seating position - Chairs should be comfortably padded and conform to the body. Chair height should be adjusted so your feet rest flat on the floor. If your chair has arms, they should be adjusted to provide arm support while you are typing. Your wrists shouldn't rest on the keyboard when typing.
  • Rest breaks - To prevent eyestrain, try to rest your eyes when using the computer for long periods. Rest your eyes for 15 minutes after two hours of continuous computer use. Also, for every 20 minutes of computer viewing, look into the distance for 20 seconds to allow your eyes a chance to refocus.
  • Blinking - To minimize your chances of developing dry eyewhen using a computer, make an effort to blink frequently. Blinking keeps the front surface of your eye moist.

 

Homoeopathic Treatment:

In Homeopathy (“homeo-” means “similar”), each of us is a total complete individual, no aspect of which can be separated from any other. In Homeopathy each patient is evaluated as a whole person- mental, emotional and physical. The prescribing remedy is based on the unique patterns found on all three levels. This means that each person is given a remedy that will stimulate his or her particular body to heal. Ten people with CVS might receive ten different homeopathic remedies.
Homoeopathy has holistic approach towards patient which means treating patient as a whole and not his specific disease or parts of body. While selecting constitutional medicine of patient his physical, emotional and general factors are considered. These make our life force called work in harmonious way, and help us to improve our immune power. A constitutional remedy chosen by an experienced prescriber is the most appropriate way to help a person with deep-seated or chronic conditions. Remedies below have been helpful in many cases of CVS, and are mentioned here to introduce a few of the possibilities homoeopathy can offer, not as suggestions for self-care.

Homeopathic Remedies(medicines) for Eye Strain and Computer Vision Syndrome

Besides some of the following ingredients, the product contains Dr Gurpreet Singh Makkar(punjab,India), Research based, highly effective medicines


Some Common Homeopathic Remedies for Eye Strain and Computer Vision Syndrome

ARNICA: Constant close focus cause sore feeling on eye. Fatigue due to overwork. Patient desire open eyes and feel dizzy on closing them.Backache due to overexertion

CONIUM MACULATUM: Light sensitivity of the eye with watering. The lids are heavy and there is difficulty focusing.

NATRIUM MURIATICUM: There is a bruised and stiff sensation, which is worse while reading and exerting the vision. It is difficult to read and the letters can run together.

ONOSMODIUM: There is a strained and tired feeling in eye muscles. There can also be a tense drawing pain over the eyes. This pain tends to be worse over the over left eye. Distances are difficult to judge.

RUTA GRAVEOLENS: Ailments from straining especially from fine work. Symptoms are worse during exertion of vision. There can be a feeling stiffness in the eye muscles.

PHYSOSTIGMA: There is twitching of the muscles around the eye. There can also be difficulty focusing and irritability after using eyes. The pupils can sometimes appear very small from eyestrain.

Pilocarpus: Good remedy for eyestrain cause may be whatever. Slightest use cause tired feeling of eye. Nausea and vertigo after use of eye. White spots before eye.

SENEGA: Dry sensation of the eye with redness of the lids. Sensation that the eye is two large. Double vision and eye strain better when bending the head backwards.

Homeopathic Herbal Tips are idea to help people to recognize potential of homeopathic medicines.None of Homeopathic medicine should be used without consent of Qualified Physician.You can take medicine from professionally Qualified physician after full case taking for more detail please follow link .

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About Dr. GS Makkar


Dr. GURPREET SINGH MAKKAR is a dynamic homeopath from India(pb). He is an ardent student of classical Homeopathy. He is a registered doctor degree holder (B.H.M.S.) from Sri Guru Nanak Dev Homoeopathic medical college(S.G.N.D Barewal Ludhiana,PUNJAB, India.
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